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WINGS Birding Tours – Photo Gallery

Cruise: Valparaiso to Los Angeles

Our cruise ship home for 2 weeks often stands out amidst the local vessels along our route. Credit: Steve Howell We will land in 5 different countries, keeping the same room. If you choose a cabin with a balcony you can even bird there. Credit: Fabrice Schmitt There are several restaurants on board that will please all palettes.  Credit: Fabrice Schmitt At some landings we’ll be alongside a dock and just walk off the ship; at others, tenders such as this will ferry us ashore. Credit: Steve Howell Watching from the ship is comfortable and nicely shaded in these mostly tropical latitudes. Credit: Steve Howell Birds along our route range from tapaculos, here a Moustached Turca…. Credit: Steve Howell …to Pterodroma petrels, here a Juan Fernandez Petrel (almost all of the seabird pictures presented in the slideshow have been taken from the ship). Credit: Steve Howell Other sea life may include whales, such as this Bryde’s (pronounced Bruder’s) Whale…. Credit: Steve Howell …as well as flyingfish, here a Pied-tailed Necromancer. Credit: Steve Howell We start in the rich Humboldt Current, home to many storm-petrels, including White-bellied… Credit: Steve Howell … White-faced… Credit: Steve Howell … plus the locally breeding Markham’s… Credit: Steve Howell … and handsome Hornby’s (or Ringed), whose breeding grounds remain unknown. Credit: Steve Howell De Filippi’s (or Masatierra) Petrel can be common during the first few days. Credit: Steve Howell Not a skua, but a dark-morph Kermadec Petrel pursuing a Juan Fernandez Petrel Credit: Steve Howell At our landing in southern Peru we plan an excursion in a smaller craft… Credit: Steve Howell …to enjoy close-up Inca Terns… Credit: Steve Howell … and with luck some Humboldt Penguins. Credit: Steve Howell Another stop in Peru may produce the cryptic Peruvian Thick-knee… Credit: Fabrice Schmitt … or the colorful Many-colored Rush-Tyrant. Credit: Fabrice Schmitt Farther north we should see Galapagos (or Waved) Albatross,  Credit: Steve Howell the beautiful Swallow-tailed Gull, Credit: Steve Howell …and the striking Galapagos Petrel. Credit: Steve Howell Tropical latitudes bring with them boobies, here a curious Nazca Booby, Credit: Steve Howell Along with groups of frigatebirds that sail effortlessly overhead. Credit: Steve Howell Sea Turtles can be numerous, here a Pacific Ridley… Credit: Steve Howell …who sometimes provide a perch for boobies such as this male Brewster’s Brown Booby. Credit: Steve Howell Many hundreds of dolphins can occur on some days, including Short-beaked Common Dolphins… Credit: Steve Howell … and Pantropical Spotted Dolphins.  Credit: Steve Howell While cff the coast of Central America, leaping devil rays may distract us at times… Credit: Steve Howell … but we should still find flocks of Wedge-tailed and Galapagos Shearwaters. Credit: Steve Howell Our landing in Costa Rica offers a chance for Scarlet Macaws… Credit: Steve Howell …and the snappy Orange-collared Manakin. Credit: Steve Howell While the landing at picturesque San Juan del Sur in Nicaragua… Credit: Steve Howell …may produce the fancy Long-tailed Manakin. Credit: Steve Howell Our birding group often attracts some attention from the crew. In 2016 the captain even came by and graciously posed for a photo with the group. Credit: Steve Howell Off Mexico’s Baja California peninsula we may see Laysan and Black-footed Albatrosses, a sure sign that we’re back in the Northern Hemisphere and approaching (Alta) California… Credit: Steve Howell … where the sun will set on our epic journey across 60 degrees of latitude; a third of the planet’s surface. Credit: Steve Howell